A book analysis of the alchemist by paulo coelho

The universal point this story makes is that everyone has a special destiny, and yet not everyone resolves to attain it because it takes hard work. Reaching one's destiny requires leaving behind familiar surroundings.

A book analysis of the alchemist by paulo coelho

SparkNotes: The Alchemist: Plot Overview

View all comments Veronica Sehnaz I think you assume that embracing individual achievements, following ones heart, etc.

Your example of Andrew Jackson and the Trail of Tears is a social-political act, which served the interests of one part of society on the expense of another part natives.

A book analysis of the alchemist by paulo coelho

Today, the world leaders around the world are initiating such actions that cause so much pain, suffering, violence in many societies. I think the motto is "live your life to its full potential and let others live theirs".

Not everyone is going to follow their own personal legend, some prefer to dream I understand where your coming from however you are missing the point. You are taking the text so literally as if you are reading the Bible. Yes the heart can be mislead however that is out of bad habit and cultural upbringings.

Now it is up to the individual themselves to make that change, and to educate themselves. People want society to agree with them, fear drove them to hurt others.

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I feel as though you are struggling with something personal right now in your life and so u reject this notion to be plausible. The problem with this little book is that it does precisely the opposite. I fear that the result of taking such a message seriously will be to make the successful even more self-satisfied, the narcissistic more self-absorbed, and the affluent more self-congratulatory.

At the same time, those who are unfortunate will blame themselves for their bad fortune, those who lack self-esteem will lose what little they have, and the poor will see--no, not God, as the beatitude says, but--the poor will see they have only themselves to blame.

Perhaps I am being too harsh. I can see how a few individual young persons, hemmed in by parental expectations and seeking their own paths, may find enough hope and courage here to help them venture forth.

Plot Overview

But I am convinced the damage done by books like this--like The Secret, The Celestine Prophecy, and anything ever written by the late Dr. Wayne Dyer or, for that matter, anything he may ever choose to channel from beyond the grave --is far greater than the little good they may achieve.

Go read a book of Hasidic tales collected by Martin Buber, a book of Sufi stories collected by Idries Shah, or a book of parables and sayings by Anthony de Mello instead. Or then again, you could just try Jesus. Jesus is always good.Paulo Coelho's enchanting novel has inspired a devoted following around the world.

This story, dazzling in its simplicity and wisdom, is about an Andalusian shepherd boy named Santiago who travels from his homeland in Spain to the Egyptian desert in search of treasure buried in the Pyramids. The Alchemist (Portuguese: O Alquimista) is a novel by Brazilian author Paulo Coelho that was first published in Originally written in Portuguese, it became an international bestseller translated into some 70 languages as of The Brazilian author PAULO COELHO is considered one of the most influential authors of our times.

His books have sold more than million copies worldwide, have been released in countries and been translated into 80 languages. Barnes & Noble® welcomes Borders®, Waldenbooks® and their customers to discover their next great read at Barnes & Noble.

Paulo Coelho's enchanting novel has inspired a devoted following around the world. This story, dazzling in its simplicity and wisdom, is about an Andalusian shepherd boy named Santiago who travels from his homeland in Spain to the Egyptian desert in search of treasure buried in the Pyramids.

The Alchemist by Paulo Coelho. Home / Bestsellers / The Alchemist / The Alchemist Analysis Literary Devices in The Alchemist.

Symbolism, Imagery, Allegory The Alchemist is about the alchemist. But is it? Is this book really about the alchemist who appears at the oasis, way in the second half of the book, and who isn't even there at.

SparkNotes: The Alchemist