An analysis of richard swinburnes the problem of evil

In his essay, "The Problem of Evil," by Richard Swinburne, the author attempts to explain how evil can exist in a world created by an omniscient, omnipotent, omnibenevolent Being, namely God.

An analysis of richard swinburnes the problem of evil

His account includes beauty, actions, thoughts and feelings as various goods.

Confessions of a skeptic: Swinburne: The problem of evil

Given the existence of God, he also argues that worship is a great good. With freedom, humans can bring about all types of great goods.

These goods are not just goods for people, but they are states which God would be expected to desire to bring about. First, there are moral evils. Moral evils are essentially those bad states of affairs which persons bring about.

Swinburne argues that some moral evil is going to be necessary, because it is simply a fact that there are good states of affairs which are logically incompatible. These sections of the book are largely made up of background, yet Swinburne interweaves his theodicy into the chapters on evil.

There is, in other words, no evil which is superfluous, no evil which is gratuitous. What reasons could God have for allowing evils like the holocaust, or animal pain? Swinburne sums up his view concisely as follows: The reason can be knowledge: Horrendous evils like the Holocaust are not just the result of choices in the present, but are the consequences of a long series of evil choices.

He has been generous, and, more so, he has made it possible for us to be generous. There is a level of inequality in the gifts received—but to any and all, gifts are given. The way people choose to use their gifts is what leads to extreme inequities.

An analysis of richard swinburnes the problem of evil

Finally, Swinburne argues that God has the right to allow evil, largely due to the extreme dependence people have upon him. Thus, Swinburne concludes that God has provided people with a choice between the good and rejection of the good.

The responsibility for that action is upon the person, not God. He rejects original guilt [he does not deny that there was an original sin and instead holds to an Eastern Orthodox view—thanks to a reader of the original review linked below for this point] [14] and denies that God knows the future free actions of creatures.

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The key point of divergence with readers will be whether they are willing to accept these reasons in conjunction with his later conclusions. God has reasons for allowing every evil, and he provides for people to have extraordinarily good lives with the afterlife, but there remain those who will reject these goods.

Those interested in the problem of evil would do well to read Providence and the Problem of Evil. In doing so, they cast aside a powerful philosophical tool for theism. Oxford, See his The Existence of God for a case for the existence of God based on positive evidence.An Analysis of Richard Swinburne's The Existence of God () Gabe Czobel.

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The Problem of Evil (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy) This section does not cite any sources.
Richard Swinburne - Wikipedia Conclusion Richard Swinburne is an icon of rational theism.

The Argument 2. Where the Argument Fails The Premises Simplicity Which God? 3. Conclusion. Richard Swinburne is an icon of rational theism. Swinburne’s response to the problem of evil Jeff Speaks February 23, Swinburne’s aim is to respond to the problem of evil by constructing “a theodicy, an explanation of why God would allow evil to occur.” (95) In order to do this, he divides.

Richard Swinburne's "The Problem of Evil": God's Existence Philosophers have looked for ways to explain God's existence for centuries. One such argment that the believer must justify in order to maintain the possibility of God's existence is the problem of evil. In his essay, &quo.

Richard Swinburnes "the Problem Of Evil": Gods Existence - Richard Swinburne's "The Problem of Evil": God's Existence Philosophers have looked for ways to explain God's existence for centuries.

One such argment that the believer must justify in order to maintain the possibility of . Apr 06,  · Book Review: “Providence and the Problem of Evil” by Richard Swinburne Posted by J.W.

Wartick ⋅ November 17, ⋅ 5 Comments Filed Under christian, Christianity, philosophy, philosophy of religion, Providence, Providence and the Problem of Evil, Richard Swinburne, Swinburne, the greater good theodicy, the problem of evil.

Thus Peter van Inwagen, throughout his book The Problem of Evil, frequently claims that various propositions are “true for all we know,” and in the “Detailed Contents” section at the beginning of his book, Richard Swinburne—to argue that, while free will is valuable, precisely how valuable it is depends upon the range of actions.

The Problem of Evil